The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

In The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, by Kate DiCamillo, Edward the china rabbit disregards the very idea of love, we can see he does this throughout the story. He lives amongst the Tulane family who loves him, they treated him as another member of the family, not just as a china doll.

“In the evening, Edward sat at the dining-room table with the other members of the Tulane family: Abilene; her mother and father; and Abilene’s grandmother, who was called Pellagrina. True, Edward’s ears barely cleared the tabletop, and true also, he spent the duration of the meal staring straight ahead at nothing but the bright and blinding white of the tablecloth. But he was there, a rabbit at the table.” . . .

“Abilene’s parents found it charming that Abilene considered Edward real, and that she sometimes requested that a phrase or story be repeated because Edward had not heard it.” . . .

“Abilene’s father would then turn in the direction of Edward’s ears and speak slowly, repeating what he had just said for the benefit of the china rabbit. Edward pretended, out of courtesy to Abilene, to listen. But, in truth, he was not very interested in what people had to say. And also he did not care for Abilene’s parents and their condescending manner toward him. All adults, in fact, condescended to him.” (pp. 6-7)

The quotes above show how much the Tulane family cared for Edward. They loved him and treated him with the utmost care. The person who loved him most was Abilene. She treated Edward like a king, dressing him up in fancy clothes and making sure he was always included. Nothing in the world was as important to her as Edward. But Edward Tulane never felt the same way with Abilene and her family. He appreciated Abilene for caring for him, but Edward did not love her or anyone else.

One night Abilene’s grandmother Pellegrina decided to tell Abilene and Edward a story. As Pellegrina spoke, she stared into Edward’s eyes and once the story had ended, it left Abilene in disbelief with Edward next to her.

“The end.” . . .

“But it can’t be.” . . .

“Why can’t it be?” . . .

“Because it ended too quickly. Because no one is living happily ever after, that’s why.” . . .

“Pellegrina nodded. She was quiet for a moment. But answer me this: how can a story end happily if there is no love?” (p. 33)

When Pelegrina said this last line she intended it towards Edward. Leaning ever closer to him as she spoke gently in his ear: “You disappoint me” (p. 33). I believe that the story was mostly a lesson for Edward, Pellegrina could, in some way, tell that Edward had no love in his china body, which is why she was disappointed in him. The moral of the story was that for you to be truly loved, you must be able to feel and to be able to feel, you must be able to accept the love that those around you share.

0